Know about world's 7 deadliest LANDSLIDES that SHOOK everyone


Haiyuan Landslides, China, 1920 - 200,000 Deaths

    Claiming approximately two lakh lives, the Haiyuan landslide that happened during the Chinese Civil War is considered to be one of the deadliest. Unexpectedly, the Gansu earthquake of 1920 had caused 675 large landslides that swept across the province.

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Vargas Tragedy, Venezuela, 1999 - 30,000 Deaths

    Around December 15, 1999, a persistent and heavy precipitation on the slopes of Sierra de Avila in the state of Vargas, Venezuela, created the conditions for thousands of tragic landslides that went down in history as the deadliest.

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Khait Landslides, Tajikistan, 1949 - 28,000 Deaths

    Triggered by the 1949 earthquake, the Khait landslides occurred in July 1949 in Tajikistan. About 33 villages were buried inside the debris. A statue of the grieving women has been built at the site to serve as the reminder of its horrific impact.

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Diexi Landslides, China, 1933 - 9,300 Deaths

    The Diexi landslides were caused by the enormous Diexi earthquake that struck Diexi Mao County, Szechwan, China, on August 25, 1933. It ruined lives of thousand of individuals.

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Yungay Landslide, Peru, 1970 - 22,000 Deaths

    The Huascarán earthquake detonated a series of seismic shocks that caused the village to collapse. The glacier on the slope of Mount Huascarán, directly above the 25,000-person settlement of Yungay, broke apart as a result of the earthquake.

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North India Landslides, India, 2013 - 5,700 To 6,054 Deaths

    About June 16, 2013, a series of landslides and floods in the northern states of India created chaos and claimed over 5,000 lives due to heavy rainfall. This catastrophe, which occurred in Uttarakhand after the 2004 tsunami, is regarded as one of the deadliest natural disasters in Indian history.

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Armero Tragedy, Colombia, 1985 - 20,000 To 23,000 Deaths

    The Armero catastrophe occurred on November 13, 1985, when the stratovolcano Nevado del Ruiz near Tolima, Colombia, erupted. This picture which was published six months after death of the little girl whose leg was stuck in the lahar under the debris of her house, later won the World Press Photo of the Year for 1985.

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