Painted by Palestinian blood: Netizens find out Satan in King Charles III's portrait, here's how to see it

Adorned in a striking hue of red, the portrait depicts King Charles wielding a downward-facing sword, accompanied by a delicate butterfly resting on his right shoulder.

Author
Mayank Kasyap
Follow us:
Courtesy: Instagram/theroyalfamily

New Delhi: The long-anticipated debut of King Charles III's official painted portrait, following his coronation, was met with a mixed reaction at Buckingham Palace on May 14. Crafted by esteemed British artist Jonathan Yeo, known for his previous works featuring figures like Tony Blair, Malala Yousafzai and Sir David Attenborough, the portrait stands at an impressive 8 feet 6 inches by 6 feet 6 inches.

Netizens draw satanic parallel

Adorned in a striking hue of red, the portrait depicts King Charles wielding a downward-facing sword, accompanied by a delicate butterfly resting on his right shoulder. While Queen Camilla expressed her approval upon viewing the artwork, online commentators were less enthused.

Critics took to various social media platforms, including Instagram and X (formerly Twitter), to voice their discontent. One Instagram user likened the dominant red tones to imagery evocative of infernal realms, while another remarked on the unsettling appearance of the monarch seemingly immersed in crimson hues.

No more conventional royal depiction?

Despite the prevalent disapproval, a minority of observers praised the portrait for its departure from conventional royal depictions. One admirer lauded its uniqueness, describing it as a refreshing departure from tradition.

Meanwhile, a X user posted the paintinng with its mirrored image which unveils the hidden Satan when the normal and the mirrored versions are posted adjacent to each other. Check the post below.

Why is there a Monarch Butterfly?

In a statement accompanying the Instagram post by the Royal Family, Jonathan Yeo shed light on his artistic vision, explaining the symbolism behind the monarch butterfly motif as a nod to King Charles' longstanding commitment to environmental causes. Reflecting on the evolution of the project from its inception during King Charles' tenure as the Prince of Wales, Yeo emphasized the dynamic nature of his subject's public persona.

As discussions surrounding the portrait continue to unfold, it remains a testament to the intersection of tradition and innovation in contemporary portraiture.