Delhi High Court affirms: Crime cannot be erased by paying compensation to victim, quashes FIR

The court's decision came in response to a plea seeking to quash an FIR for an attempt to murder based on a settlement between the involved parties.

Author
Satyam Singh
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In a recent ruling, the Delhi High Court emphasized that criminal law serves to regulate society's behavior. The court asserted that a crime cannot be absolved through compensation alone. The court's decision came in response to a plea seeking to quash an FIR for an attempt to murder based on a settlement between the involved parties.

What is objective of criminal law?

Justice Anoop Kumar Mendiratta, presiding over the case, declined the petition by the accused, highlighting the primary goal of criminal law. He stressed the necessity to prevent the recurrence of serious offenses like Section 307 (attempt to murder) of the Indian Penal Code (IPC), emphasizing that settlements should not foster further criminal behavior or endanger societal welfare.

What is court's perspective on the matter? 

In its verdict, the court emphasized the severity of the offense, noting that the victim sustained stab injuries to vital body parts over a minor issue. Despite compensation offered to the victim, the court maintained that this does not suffice as grounds for quashing proceedings. It underscored that criminal law aims at social control and cannot be nullified solely by financial compensation.

The petitioners sought to quash the FIR based on a settlement with the victim, disavowing any admission of guilt. However, the court upheld the FIR, considering the gravity of the offense and its implications for societal order.

Careful exercise of legal powers

The court emphasized the need for prudence in quashing cases, particularly for heinous crimes like murder, rape, or dacoity. These offenses, it noted, have profound societal ramifications and demand careful judicial consideration.

Underlining the seriousness of offenses under IPC Section 307, the court stressed that such crimes are not only against individuals but also against society at large. These crimes, it concluded, warrant stringent legal scrutiny due to their far-reaching consequences.