Who is Amir Sarfaraz? Assassin of Sarabjit Singh shot dead in Lahore

Sarfaraz, known for his role in executing Indian national Sarabjit Singh on orders from Pakistan's intelligence agency ISI, met his demise in a targeted shooting.

Author
Satyam Singh
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In a startling development from Pakistan, notorious underworld figure Amir Sarfaraz has been gunned down by unidentified attackers in Lahore. Sarfaraz, known for his role in executing Indian national Sarabjit Singh on orders from Pakistan's intelligence agency ISI, met his demise in a targeted shooting.

The incident has reignited discussions surrounding the tragic fate of Sarabjit, a Punjab farmer who inadvertently crossed into Pakistan in 1990 and was ensnared in espionage allegations.

What happened to Sarabjit Singh?

Sarabjit Singh, a resident of Bhikhiwind village in India's Tarn Taran district, found himself embroiled in a life-altering ordeal when he inadvertently crossed the India-Pakistan border on August 30, 1990. His inadvertent journey led to his arrest by Pakistani authorities, who accused him of involvement in bomb blasts in Lahore and Faisalabad, resulting in the deaths of 14 individuals. Despite his protests of innocence, Sarabjit was convicted and sentenced to death in 1991 for his alleged role in the bombings.

Amidst the tumult of imprisonment, Sarabjit Singh faced further tragedy when he was attacked by fellow inmates within Lahore's Kot Lakhpat jail, resulting in severe injuries that left him in a vegetative state. Despite international appeals for clemency and doubts regarding his guilt, Sarabjit's condition continued to deteriorate, and he was declared brain-dead by Pakistani authorities.

Sarabji shares ordeal through letters

While incarcerated at Kot Lakhpat jail in Pakistan, Sarabjit, an Indian national, conveyed his ordeal in a letter dispatched to India. He expressed distress over the past few months, noting that an unknown substance had been added to his meals. 

This concoction caused severe physical deterioration, with his body experiencing a gradual decline. Sarabjit lamented excruciating pain in his left hand and the progressive weakness of his right leg. He likened the food provided to poison, deeming it impossible to consume and digest due to its harmful effects.